Food Value Chain Development in Central New York: CNY Bounty

  • Becca B. R. Jablonski Cornell University
  • Javier Perez-Burgos Cornell University
  • Miguel I. Gómez Cornell University
Keywords: Agriculture Of The Middle, Distribution, Food Hub, Local Food, New York Agriculture, Rural Economic Development, Value Chain

Abstract

In the past 10 years, demand for locally grown food has increased dramatically. Concomitantly, small, commercial farms have declined disproportionately to small and large farms. The decline may be due to the lack of appropriately scaled marketing and distribution resulting from changing markets. This article presents a case study of a component of a food value chain started in 2007, Central New York (CNY) Bounty. CNY Bounty markets and distributes products produced by 119 small, commercial farms and processors to individual households, restaurants, natural food stores, and universities. In the past four years, CNY Bounty has experienced mixed success in terms of its economic viability, which can offer some important lessons for practitioners and contributions for food value chain research.

Author Biographies

Becca B. R. Jablonski, Cornell University
Becca B. R. Jablonski, PhD student, Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, 314 West Sibley, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.
Javier Perez-Burgos, Cornell University
PhD student, Department of City and Regional Planning, Cornell University, 314 West Sibley, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.
Miguel I. Gómez, Cornell University
Assistant Professor, Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 246 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.
Published
2011-08-04
How to Cite
Jablonski, B., Perez-Burgos, J., & Gómez, M. (2011). Food Value Chain Development in Central New York: CNY Bounty. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 1(4), 129-141. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2011.014.015
Section
Food Value Chains Call Papers