A Food Hub to Address Healthy Food Access Gaps: Residents' Preferences

  • Jill K. Clark The Ohio State University
  • Chaturia Rouse Case Western Reserve University
  • Ashwini R. Sehgal Case Western Reserve University
  • Mary Bailey Case Western Reserve University
  • Bethany A. Bell University of South Carolina
  • Stephanie N. Pike Case Western Reserve University
  • Patricia A. Sharpe University of South Carolina
  • Darcy A. Freedman Case Western Reserve University
Keywords: Food Hub, Food Access, Food Desert, Urban, Poverty, Consumer Demographics, Consumer Preferences, Food Environment

Abstract

Interventions aimed at improving access to healthy food in low-income communities should consider the preferences of residents. Household food shop­pers in two urban, low-income communities were asked about their preferences for vendors at, and qualities of, a potential nearby food hub. Universally, participants preferred availability of whole foods, primarily fruits and vegetables. They also favored cleanliness, quality, and affordability. The demographics and preferences of potential customers raise central issues that would need to be integrated into the development of a food hub, namely affordability (likely through subsidization), attention to accommodation and cultural accessibility, and programming that builds community.

Author Biographies

Jill K. Clark, The Ohio State University

Assistant Professor, John Glenn College of Public Affairs

Chaturia Rouse, Case Western Reserve University

Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine

Ashwini R. Sehgal, Case Western Reserve University

Center for Reducing Health Disparities

Mary Bailey, Case Western Reserve University

Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine

Bethany A. Bell, University of South Carolina

College of Social Work

Stephanie N. Pike, Case Western Reserve University

Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine

Patricia A. Sharpe, University of South Carolina

Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health

Darcy A. Freedman, Case Western Reserve University

Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine

Published
2019-05-01
How to Cite
Clark, J., Rouse, C., Sehgal, A., Bailey, M., Bell, B., Pike, S., Sharpe, P., & Freedman, D. (2019). A Food Hub to Address Healthy Food Access Gaps: Residents’ Preferences. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 9(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2019.091.010