Community Capitals Policing merges food economy and public safety, repairing decades of harm

  • Martin J. Neideffer Alameda County Sheriff’s Office
Keywords: Community Capitals Policing, Public Safety, Circular Food Economy, Community Capitals Framework, Food Dignity, Local Food Systems

Abstract

First paragraphs:

A local, circular food economy like the one we are building in Alameda County, California, will not only alleviate food insecurity, create jobs, and improve the environment, it is also a center­piece of our 15-year-long effort to strengthen social cohesion, repair trust, and improve public safety through a revolutionary new approach to policing. 

More than 15 years ago, the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office launched a new brand of public safety, called Community Capitals Policing,[1] in Ashland and Cherryland, two unincorporated communities just south of Oakland, California. These communities have experienced dispropor­tionate levels of crime, poverty, disinvestment, disease, unemployment, and blight since the late 1970s.

Our work, based on the community capitals framework (Fey, Bregendahl, & Flora, 2006), is taking a systems-level approach to repair the harm done to the community over decades of systemic racism and neglect. The work is informed by a seven-year project called Food Dignity, funded by a US$5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. . . .

[1] See more about Community Capitals Policing at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Q06HRbTTloOkztzVZfwBXIlFIbyT-Ccx/view

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Author Biography

Martin J. Neideffer, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office

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Published
2020-12-09
How to Cite
Neideffer, M. (2020). Community Capitals Policing merges food economy and public safety, repairing decades of harm. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 10(1), 247–249. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2020.101.031
Section
Commentaries on COVID-19 and the Food System