Using a Market Basket to Explore Regional Food Systems

  • Kate Clancy Food Systems Consultant
  • Alessandro Bonanno Colorado State University
  • Patrick Canning USDA-Economic Research Service
  • Rebecca Cleary Colorado State University
  • Zach Conrad Tufts University
  • David Fleisher USDA-Agricultural Research Service
  • Miguel Gómez Cornell University
  • Timothy Griffin Tufts University
  • Ryan Lee Johns Hopkins University
  • Daniel Kane Yale University
  • Anne Palmer Johns Hopkins University
  • Kristen Park Cornell University
  • Christian J. Peters Tufts University
  • Nicole Tichenor University of New Hampshire
Keywords: Regional Food Systems, Regional Self-Reliance, Food Security, Market Basket, Supply Chains, Marketing and Distribution Systems, Economic Impact, Consumer Purchasing Behavior, Optimization Models, Adaptation to Climate Change

Abstract

The market basket chosen for the Enhancing Food Security in the Northeast (EFSNE) project was one of its major tools, as its contents served as the subject of a variety of analyses across the research teams. The interdisciplinary systems project studied multiple components of food systems in the Northeast region. One of the team members’ first collaborative exercises was the choice of the eight items representing the major food groups, includ­ing different processed forms of food and healthier versions of several. This article summarizes the information gathered on the market basket items, including (1) some salient data describing the state of each food item’s industry; (2) the current regional-self-reliance production level; (3) consu­mer purchases of these items in the Northeast utilizing secondary data sources and data gathered in project intercept surveys; (4) store inventories, including prices and where the food is produced or manufactured; (5) the percentage of the market basket food that is produced regionally, as well as the regional economic value-added percentage; (6) models of six of the foods predicting the effect on production and supply chains of changes in the system, such as increased demand and environ­mental changes; and (7) foodprints for each food. Market baskets are frequently used instruments in food environment and cost studies. Using market baskets in EFSNE allowed the teams to aggregate and interconnect data from multiple analyses done by researchers from multiple disciplines to tell a rich story about a specific set of foods, their supply chains, and the future opportunities to enhance their production and distribution in the region.

Author Biographies

Kate Clancy, Food Systems Consultant
Food systems consultant; University Park, MD 20782
Alessandro Bonanno, Colorado State University
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Colorado State University; Clark Building, Room B327; Fort Collins, CO 80524
Patrick Canning, USDA-Economic Research Service
USDA-Economic Research Service; 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Mail Stop 1800; Washington, DC 20250-1800
Rebecca Cleary, Colorado State University
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Colorado State University; Clark Building, Room B327; Fort Collins, CO 80524
Zach Conrad, Tufts University
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; 150 Harrison Avenue; Boston MA 02111
David Fleisher, USDA-Agricultural Research Service
USDA-Agricultural Research Service–Northeast Area, Adaptive Cropping Systems Laboratory; 10300 Baltimore Avenue; Beltsville, MD 20750
Miguel Gómez, Cornell University
Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University; 340D Warren Hall; Ithaca, NY 14853
Timothy Griffin, Tufts University
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; 150 Harrison Avenue; Boston MA 02111
Ryan Lee, Johns Hopkins University
Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; 615 North Wolfe Street, W7010; Baltimore, MD 21205-2179
Daniel Kane, Yale University
School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University; 370 Prospect Street; New Haven, CT 06511
Anne Palmer, Johns Hopkins University
Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; 615 North Wolfe Street, W7010; Baltimore, MD 21205-2179
Kristen Park, Cornell University
Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University; 340D Warren Hall; Ithaca, NY 14853
Christian J. Peters, Tufts University
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University; 150 Harrison Avenue; Boston MA 02111
Nicole Tichenor, University of New Hampshire
Sustainability Institute, University of New Hampshire; 131 Main Street; Durham NH 03824
EFSNE Project Logo
Published
2017-12-20

Most read articles by the same author(s)